Healthcare · Podcast

The Terrible Story of the Anthrax Vaccine Program

If you’re a veteran that deployed to Iraq, then you likely remember getting the anthrax vaccine.  We were told it was because either Al-Qaeda or local Iraqi extremists could get hold of anthrax and weaponize it.  We were told the vaccine was safe.  And we were told it was mandatory.

Turns out those were lies.

And if you refused the vaccine?  That was refusal of a direct order, and you’d get punished.  Over 1000 military members were dishonorably discharged for what they considered to be an unsafe risk.  And it turns out they were right.

But that would just make it a story.  Possibly a bad one.  But not terrible.

Oh, there’s more.

A letter was sent to Senator Tom Daschle’s office in October of 2001 that contained anthrax.  That attack was used as reasoning by the DoD to continue the vaccination program, even though the FDA wouldn’t license the vaccine and the GAO came out with reports questioning the safety and efficacy.

Who sent the anthrax to the Senator?  In 2010 it was determined by the FBI that an Army scientist, to save the dying anthrax vaccination program, intentionally created a nationwide anthrax scare one month after the Twin Towers fell.

This story has an incredible amount of twists & turns, and tomorrow we will speak with expert navigators: a retired Air Force commander that refused to give the vaccine, and his lawyer who proved in court that the DoD broke the law by ordering them in the first place.

But what about those 1000+ veterans with dishonorable discharges?  We’ll talk about them too, and what’s next.

For the entire story of the fight for truth, read Tom’s article here: Article

The Washington Post posted, in 2000, an opinion piece by Tom that explained his refusal to take the vaccine.  Bear in mind, this is before 9/11, before the anthrax letter, before we considered going into Iraq and Afghanistan.  Article

And of course, listen to the podcast tomorrow about this entire terrible story.

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